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168飞艇是官方开奖结果 飞艇速度极速 168幸运飞行艇官方开奖网站 飞艇图片 From the Archives:

  • Working

    Working

    An episode from 10/11/21: Tonight, a small episode where I talk about working, and about empathy and sympathy for those who live doing work they do not love, and which they derive little meaning from. Perhaps it describes you, or someone you know. Don’t forget to support Human Voices Wake Us on Substack, where you……

  • Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats

    Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats

    An episode from 10/20/21: Tonight, we hear anecdotes from the lives of two very different poets, Walt Whitman and W. B. Yeats. The remarks from Whitman come from the journals he kept while working out the poems that went into the first edition of Leaves of Grass, while the comments from Yeats span the first……

  • American Shaman (new episode)

    American Shaman (new episode)

    Tonight, I talk about writing my long poem, ⁠To the House of the Sun⁠, published in 2015. The poem follows an Irish immigrant making his way through the American South, North and West, during the Civil War. The book is part travelogue, battle epic, and spiritual biography, and after describing how the book was written,……

  • The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel (Celtic)

    The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel (Celtic)

    An episode from 10/30/21: In this seventh episode on Celtic mythology, I review one of the greatest surviving stories in the tradition, Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, or The Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel. Since it is also fairly long, I only share two small sections from the story itself: a piece from the beginning, and……

  • William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode & 3 Other Poems

    William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode & 3 Other Poems

    An episode from 11/4/21: Tonight, I read four of William Wordsworth’s greatest poems. On some days, it’s only rolling along with Wordsworth’s rhymed or unrhymed reminiscences or descriptions of nature, that teaches again what poetry is about, what poetry can do: Each of these can be found in the Selected Poems of Wordsworth that I……

  • Louise Glück: Poems from “The Wild Iris” & “Ararat”

    Louise Glück: Poems from “The Wild Iris” & “Ararat”

    An episode from 11/13/21: Tonight, I read eight poems from Louise Glück’s 1992 collection, The Wild Iris. Following these are an episode from March, 2021, of six poems from her 1990 book, Ararat. A good barometer for determining any poet’s best work is “the poems nobody else could have written,” and indeed there is nothing……

  • How Did Picasso Do It?

    How Did Picasso Do It?

    An episode from 11/16/21: Tonight, I read from a few books on Pablo Picasso, where he talks about how the power behind his own paintings, and his huge output, remained a mystery for him as much as anyone else. The lasting nature of his work seems to be less about how consciously he went about……

  • First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) and San Francisco (AD 1906)

    First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) and San Francisco (AD 1906)

    An episode from 11/19/21, where I read about two disasters separated by nearly two thousand years: the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in the year 79, and the earthquake that destroyed so much of San Francisco in 1906. My sources are a letter from Pliny the younger (⁠read it here⁠), where he describes Vesuvius and Pompeii,……

  • First Person: London, 1616

    First Person: London, 1616

    An episode from 12/5/21: Tonight, I read from chapter six of Peter Ackroyd’s history of early seventeenth-century England, ⁠Civil War (or Rebellion⁠, as the book has been retitled in its America). As usual, few writers are as ablet as Ackroyd to bring the past to life, and he uses two texts to paint a brief……

  • Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s

    Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s

    An episode from 12/7/21: Tonight, I read eleven short poems from a handful of books that Ted Hughes published during the 1970s. As I talk about in the introduction, this decade saw the writing and publication of Hughes’s most powerful books: Crow, Moortown Diary, Remains of Elmet, and River (which themselves did not find their……

  • Anthology: Poems by Masters, Tennyson, Robinson, Wotton & Raleigh

    Anthology: Poems by Masters, Tennyson, Robinson, Wotton & Raleigh

    An episode from 12/18/21: Tonight, I read five poems going back four hundred years. Edgar Lee Masters channels the unsung poet and victim of horrendous violence, Tennyson takes a crack at Odysseus, Mary Robinson describes the morning, Henry Wotton gets religious, and Walter Raleigh wonders aloud about truth and lies. As a bonus, I read……

  • Ted Hughes: 5 Poems from “Birthday Letters”

    Ted Hughes: 5 Poems from “Birthday Letters”

    An episode from 12/21/21: Tonight, I read five poems from Ted Hughes’s last book, Birthday Letters (1998). This is the book where Hughes finally addressed his relationship to Sylvia Plath in verse, nearly forty years after her suicide. In my introduction to the poems, I also talk about the strange phenomena, both of audiences demanding……

  • Anthology: Poems by Amy Lowell, Thomas Hardy, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe

    Anthology: Poems by Amy Lowell, Thomas Hardy, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe

    An episode from 12/25/21: Tonight, we hear five poems from four centuries: Amy Lowell on unrequited love, Thomas Hardy bringing in the twentieth century, William Cower’s winter evening, John Donne trying to defuse the power of death, and Christopher Marlowe trying to get the attention of that shepherdess: Don’t forget to support Human Voices Wake……

  • First Person: Minnesota, c. 1900

    First Person: Minnesota, c. 1900

    An episode from 11/27/20: A reading from Studs Terkel’s book, ⁠American Dreams: Lost & Found⁠. Here, Andy Johnson talks about his life in rural Minnesota at the turn of the twentieth century. The interview is also included in Terkel’s best-of volume, ⁠The Studs Terkel Reader⁠.  Don’t forget to support Human Voices Wake Us on Substack,……

  • The Midsummer Festivals of Old Europe (new episode)

    The Midsummer Festivals of Old Europe (new episode)

    Tonight, I read from James George Frazer’s Golden Bough, from the accounts he collected on the midsummer fire festivals in premodern Europe. I also discuss the relevance of these stories to a long poem-in-progress of mine, The Great Year, as well as my own adventures in acquiring all thirteen volumes of Frazer’s great work. The……

  • Pythagoras: New episode, poem, & interview

    Pythagoras: New episode, poem, & interview

    Tonight, I’m thrilled to read a poem that I began working on three years ago on the life, teachings, and mysticism of the Greek philosopher, Pythagoras (c. 570- c.495 BCE). I am also thrilled that the poem is being simultaneously published at ⁠The Basilisk Tree⁠. Many thanks to its editor, Bryan Helton, for coordinating all……

  • George Orwell on Poverty

    George Orwell on Poverty

    An episode from 2/13/21: George Orwell’s 1933 memoir of voluntary poverty, Down and Out in Paris and London, can still rip your heart out. Tonight, I read a few passages from it. Nobody has ever brought written about the reality of poverty as viscerally and sympathetically as him. Don’t forget to support Human Voices Wake……

  • George Orwell on War

    George Orwell on War

    An episode from 3/21/21: Tonight, I read from three newspaper articles by George Orwell on the outcry over Allied bombings of German cities during World War Two, and the aftermath of the atomic bombs being dropped on Japan. Nobody writes about war like George Orwell, and it’s refreshing to hear someone suggest that there’s no point……

  • Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England

    Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England

    An episode from 10/14/21: What does culture and education mean when literacy, let alone the owning of books, is so rare? Tonight, I read two chapters from Peter Ackroyd’s book, ⁠Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination⁠. The first covers education in eighth-century England, and specifically the life of the Venerable Bede. The second is……

  • Beethoven on His Deathbed

    Beethoven on His Deathbed

    An episode from 10/17/21: The death Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) came after a long series of illnesses. By then, friends and admirers and hangers-on sought out the composer in his last days. Tonight, I read Jan Swafford’s account of Beethoven’s death in his incredible biography, ⁠Beethoven: Anguish & Triumph⁠. Swafford’s book also includes one of the……